lynsey addario, photographer

Darfur

Darfur Crisis, 2004 to present

An overhead view of the remains of the burned-out village of Abu Sourouj, which was bombed on the 8 February by the Sudanese government and simultaneously attacked by armed men on camels, horseback and donkeys, otherwise known as Janjaweed, in West Darfur, Sudan, February 28, 2008.  The government spate of bombings was in response to an ambush two months prior by rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement, and subsequent intelligence that JEM members were living in these villages and using them as a base. After a period of relative quiet, there has been a great deal of renewed fighting between the Sudanese government with militias loyal to the government and rebel factions, namely JEM. Dozens of civilians in Silean, Sirba, and Abu Sourouj were killed in the attacks around February 8-9th,many others were injured, and a large percentage of each of the three villages was burned to the ground.
  
Soldiers with the Sudanese Liberation Army wait by their truck while struck in the mud and hit by a sandsortm in North Darfur, Sudan, August 21, 2004.
  
A Sudanese Liberation Army soldier walks through the remains of Hangala village, which was burned by Janjaweed near Farawiya, in Darfur, several months ago, August 27, 2004.  Thousands of ethnic Africans have fled their villages in search of shelter in the mountains or in neighboring Chad because of continuing attacks on civilians.
     
  
Sudanese women sit and await food and non-food items being distributed by international humanitarian organizations in the village of Selea, which was recently bombed along with two other villages north of Geneina by the Sudanese government and simultaneously attacked by armed men on camels, horseback and donkeys, otherwise known as Janjaweed, in West Darfur, Sudan, February 28, 2008.  The government spate of bombings was in response to an ambush two months prior by rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement, and subsequent intelligence that JEM members were living in these villages and using them as a base. After a period of relative quiet, there has been a great deal of renewed fighting between the Sudanese government with militias loyal to the government and rebel factions, namely JEM. Dozens of civilians in Selean, Sirba, and Abu Sarooj were killed in the attacks around February 8-9th,many others were injured, and a large percentage of each of the three villages was burned to the ground.
  
Sudanese women sit and await food and non-food items being distributed by international humanitarian organizations in the village of Selea, which was recently bombed along with two other villages north of Geneina by the Sudanese government and simultaneously attacked by armed men on camels, horseback and donkeys, otherwise known as Janjaweed, in West Darfur, Sudan, February 28, 2008.  The government spate of bombings was in response to an ambush two months prior by rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement, and subsequent intelligence that JEM members were living in these villages and using them as a base. After a period of relative quiet, there has been a great deal of renewed fighting between the Sudanese government with militias loyal to the government and rebel factions, namely JEM. Dozens of civilians in Selean, Sirba, and Abu Sarooj were killed in the attacks around February 8-9th,many others were injured, and a large percentage of each of the three villages was burned to the ground.
  
Sudanese women sit and await food and non-food items being distributed by international humanitarian organizations in the village of Selea, which was recently bombed along with two other villages north of Geneina by the Sudanese government and simultaneously attacked by armed men on camels, horseback and donkeys, otherwise known as Janjaweed, in West Darfur, Sudan, February 28, 2008.  The government spate of bombings was in response to an ambush two months prior by rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement, and subsequent intelligence that JEM members were living in these villages and using them as a base. After a period of relative quiet, there has been a great deal of renewed fighting between the Sudanese government with militias loyal to the government and rebel factions, namely JEM. Dozens of civilians in Selean, Sirba, and Abu Sarooj were killed in the attacks around February 8-9th,many others were injured, and a large percentage of each of the three villages was burned to the ground.
     
  
African Union soldiers find the village of Tama freshly burning more than a week after it was originally attacked by Arab Nomads backed by government forces North of Nyala, November 2005.  The AU made several attempts at patrolling and conducting an investigation on the village of Tama after it was attacked, and the surviving villagers fled to a nearby village, and was kept away by nomads who continued to surround the village and shoot at approaching vehicles.  Hundreds of villages have been burned and pillaged throughout Darfur by Arab Nomads, leaving hundreds of thousands of civilians displaced throughout the country.
  
An Internally displaced mother and daughter sit beneath a mosquito net while being treated for malnutrition at the Kalma camp for IDPs in Nyala, South darfur, Sudan, November 2005.  As fighting continues across darfur between Arab nomads backed by government forces and ethnic Africans of the Fur and Zargawa tribes, hundreds of thousands of internally displaced civilians continue to flood the camps.
  
A seven week old boy fighting with malnutrition and intestinal blockage is held on the x-raying table by a technician as his mother looks on in the government hospital in Geneina, in west Darfur, March 8, 2007.  Since the beginning of the war in Darfur, over two million people have been displaced from their villages throughout the region, and hundreds of thousands have been killed.  Though much progress has been made by NGOs and the United Nations in flighting disease and malnutrition in IDP camps and throughout darfur, many darfurians are still struggling with malnutrition, malaria, respiratory infection, etc.
     
  
Fadila Ahmed Mohamat stands in the ashes of her home as she and other Sudanese civilians pick through the remains of their burned-out huts, and start to rebuild in the village of Abu Surouj, as troops with the United National African MIssion in Darfur patrol the area, in Abu Surouj, West Darfur, Sudan, February 28, 2008.   Abu Surouj was bombed on February 8, 2008, along with two other villages north of Geneina by the Sudanese government and simultaneously attacked by armed men on camels, horseback and donkeys, otherwise known as Janjaweed, sending thousands of civilians fleeing the area.  The government spate of bombings was in response to an ambush two months prior by rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement, and subsequent intelligence that JEM members were living in these villages and using them as a base. After a period of relative quiet, there has been a great deal of renewed fighting between the Sudanese government with militias loyal to the government and rebel factions, namely JEM. Dozens of civilians in Selean, Sirba, and Abu Surouj were killed in the attacks around February 8th,many others were injured, and a large percentage of each of the three villages was burned to the ground.
  
Halima Yahyah Adam, 45, sifts through the ash of one her homes as she and other villagers pick through the remains of their burned-out huts, and start to rebuild in the village of Abu Sourouj, which was bombed on February 8, 2008, along with two other villages north of Geneina by the Sudanese government and simultaneously attacked by armed men on camels, horseback and donkeys, otherwise known as Janjaweed, in West Darfur, Sudan, February 28, 2008.  The government spate of bombings was in response to an ambush two months prior by rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement, and subsequent intelligence that JEM members were living in these villages and using them as a base. After a period of relative quiet, there has been a great deal of renewed fighting between the Sudanese government with militias loyal to the government and rebel factions, namely JEM. Dozens of civilians in Silean, Sirba, and Abu Sourouj were killed in the attacks around February 8-9th,many others were injured, and a large percentage of each of the three villages was burned to the ground.
  
Villagers from Tama load the remains of their belongings onto a truck to take them off to where they have fled at Uma Kasara village almost two weeks after Tama was attacked, and around 40 people were killed by Arab Nomads backed by government forces North of Nyala, November 2005.  The AU made several attempts at patrolling and conducting an investigation on the village of Tama after it was attacked, and the surviving villagers fled to a nearby village, and was kept away by nomads who continued to surround the village and shoot at approaching vehicles.  Hundreds of villages have been burned and pillaged throughout Darfur by Arab Nomads, leaving hundreds of thousands of civilians displaced throughout the country.
     
  
Villagers from Tama carry the remains of their belongings to where they have fled at Uma Kasara village almost two weeks after Tama was attacked, and around 40 people were killed by Arab Nomads backed by government forces North of Nyala, November 2005.  The AU made several attempts at patrolling and conducting an investigation on the village of Tama after it was attacked, and the surviving villagers fled to a nearby village, and was kept away by nomads who continued to surround the village and shoot at approaching vehicles.  Hundreds of villages have been burned and pillaged throughout Darfur by Arab Nomads, leaving hundreds of thousands of civilians displaced throughout the country.
  
Villagers wrap the body of an old woman before her buriel in the Kalma camp for internally displaced people in Nyala, South darfur, Sudan, November 2005.  As fighting continues across darfur between Arab nomads backed by government forces and ethnic Africans of the Fur and Zargawa tribes, hundreds of thousands of internally displaced civilians continue to flood the camps.
  
     
  
A woman walks through an area outside of Kabkabiya village, a central crossing point for nomads, in North Darfur, October 24, 2005.  The Arab Nomads, often grouped in their entirety with Darfur's Janjaweed by association, are are often unfairly blamed for the region's violence.
  
Women from Tama village pick thorns out of the feet of Ibrahim Abakar Ismael, 6, as he lies with his grandmother shortly after being picked up by the African Union three days after he and others fled Tama village as it was being attacked by Janjaweed soldiers in South Darfur, Sudan, October 26th, 2005.  Ismael's parents were both killed in the attack on his village, leaving him with only his grandmother. More than two years after Darfur's civil war began between Africans and  Arab Janjaweed, backed up by the government, hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, and almost a million have been displaced by ongoing attacks.
  
Sudanese internally displaced civilians newly arrived to Zam Zam camp wait for a food distribution outside of El Fascher, in North Darfur, October 16, 2005.  With an upsurge of recent attacks against villagers, thousands have flocked back into camps thay had since evacuated to return homes, revealing an increasingly unstable situation in the Darfur region of Sudan.
     
  
An internally displaced boy with a resipratory infection sits in the local Zallingi hospital in west Darfur, February 2007.  Since the beginning of the war in Darfur, over two million people have been displaced from their villages throughout the region, and hundreds of thousands have been killed.  Though much progress has been made by NGOs and the United Nations in flighting disease and malnutrition in IDP camps and throughout darfur, many darfurians are still struggling with malnutrition, malaria, respiratory infection, etc.
  
Internally displaced women line up at a water pump for water at dawn at Hamadiya camp in Zallingi, in West darfur, February 2007.  Since the beginning of the war in Darfur, over two million people have been displaced from their villages throughout the region, and hundreds of thousands have been killed.
  
Fatima Abdul Kareem, 65, right, lies beside Kaltoom Nasradeem, 60, shortly after they were picked up by African Union representatives, weak and injured on the side of the road, during an AU investigation of an attack three days prior on Tama village by Janjaweed soldiers in South Darfur, Sudan, October 26th, 2005. More than two years after Darfur's civil war began between Africans and  Arab Janjaweed, backed up by the government, hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, and almost a million have been displaced by ongoing attacks.
     
  
An internally displaced woman holds the bloated stomach of her severely malnourished child before a feeding in the local Zallingi hospital in west Darfur, February 2007.  Since the beginning of the war in Darfur, over two million people have been displaced from their villages throughout the region, and hundreds of thousands have been killed.  Though much progress has been made by NGOs and the United Nations in flighting disease and malnutrition in IDP camps and throughout darfur, many darfurians are still struggling with malnutrition, malaria, respiratory infection, etc.
  
A woman from Tama village inspects her hut for the first time since fleeing after her village was attacked by Arab Nomads allegedly backed by government forces North of Nyala, November 2005.  Around 40 people were killed in the massacre almost two weeks prior, leaving the survivors displaced to a nearby village.  Hundreds of villages have been burned and pillaged throughout Darfur by Arab Nomads, leaving hundreds of thousands of civilians displaced throughout the country.
  
Fatima Tom Adam, 35, from the village of Abunduruk, in Sudan near the Chadian border.  She claims Janjaweed killed her first husband, and shot her in the face almost two years ago.  The bullet entered under her eye, and exited behind her ear.  She now lives in Farchana Refugee camp with her children in Chad, and is remarried. August 2004.
     
  
Two malnourished children lie in a feeding center in the Oure Cassone camp in Bahai, Chad, roughly seven kilometers from the Sudan border, August 17, 2004.  Thousands of refugees have streamed out of Sudan into Chad in recent months as fighting persists in Darfur.
  
Chadian girls brave a sandstorm in Bahai, Chad, roughly seven kilometers from the Sudan border, August 18, 2004.  Thousands of refugees have streamed out of Sudan into Chad in recent months as fighting persists in Darfur.
  
An internally displaced woman rides her donkey through kalma camp in Nyala, South darfur, Sudan, November 2005.  As fighting continues across darfur between Arab nomads backed by government forces and ethnic Africans of the Fur and Zargawa tribes, hundreds of thousands of internally displaced civilians continue to flood the camps.
     
  
Sudanese internally displaced civilians newly arrived to Zam Zam camp wait for a food distribution outside of El Fascher, in North Darfur, October 19, 2005.  With an upsurge of recent attacks against villagers, thousands have flocked back into camps thay had since evacuated to return homes, revealing an increasingly unstable situation in the Darfur region of Sudan.
  
nternally displaced children walk through a sandstorm at Hamadiya camp in Zallingi, in West darfur, February 2007.  Since the beginning of the war in Darfur, over two million people have been displaced from their villages throughout the region, and hundreds of thousands have been killed.
  
Internally displaced families in their makeshift home while awaiting shelter shortly after arriving at Hamadiya camp at dawn in Zallingi, in West darfur, February 2007.  Since the beginning of the war in Darfur, over two million people have been displaced from their villages throughout the region, and hundreds of thousands have been killed.
     
  
  
Soldiers with the Sudanese Liberation Army eat breakfast at the Shigekaro base in Darfur, Sudan,  August  2004.  The SLA is one of the Sudanese rebel groups controlling parts of Darfur.Rebels, and are currently staging a 24-hour boycott of the Nigerian peace talks for Sudan in protest of recent new attacks against civilians in Darfur, which they say killed 75 civilians in six villages.Up to 50,000 people have died since the conflict began in February 2003 and more than a million have fled their homes for fear of attack by the Janjaweed.
  
Soldiers with the police division of the Sudanese Liberation Army train at a base in Shigekaro, Darfur, Sudan,  August  2004.  The SLA is one of several of Sudanese rebel groups controlling parts of Darfur.
     
  
A young boy sits against a shrapnel-scarred wall while attending a rebel conference for the Sudanese Liberation Army  in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaces, and thousands killed in fighting.
  
Khalid Saleh Banat, 13, a soldier with the Sudanese Liberation Army, stands with other SLA soldiers after training in the morning in the village of Shigekaro, in Darfur, August 22, 2004.  Khalid has been with the SLA for two years, joining at the minimum age for a soldier at 11.
  
Rebels with the Sudanese Liberation Army train at dawn while attending a large rebel conference in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaces, and thousands killed in fighting.
     
  
Rebels with the Sudanese Liberation Army attend a large rebel conference in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaced, and thousands killed in fighting.
  
Rebels with the Sudanese Liberation Army attend a large rebel conference in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaced, and thousands killed in fighting.
  
Rebels with the Sudanese Liberation Army attend a large rebel conference in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaced, and thousands killed in fighting.
     
  
Sudanese Liberation Army soldiers walk past a dead body left from an attack on civilians in the district of Farawyaiah, Darfur, August 24, 2004.  Sixteen bodies lay in the surrounding ravines after men from five nearby  villages were killed allegedly by Janjaweed backed by Sudanese Government forces.
  
Yousef Hamiz, 22, a Sudanese rebel with the Justice and Equality Movement, lies burned in a hospital in Iriba, Chad, October 15, 2006. Hamiz was in a car with five other rebels when it was attacked by Sudanese government forces near Tine, along the Chad Darfur border, and does not know what happened to his fellow fighters. Fierce fighting along the border of eastern Chad and darfur has sent dozens of Darfur rebels and Sudanese government troops wounded to hospitals in Chad.
  
Rebels with the Sudanese Liberation Army attend a large rebel conference in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaced, and thousands killed in fighting.
     
  
Rebels with the Sudanese Liberation Army train at dawn while attending a large rebel conference in Haskanita, in SLA territory in Darfur, Sudan, October 2005.  As fighting continues throughout darfur between Arab nomads  backed by government forces and ethnic Africans led by SLA fighters and other rebel groups, hundreds of thousands of Darfurians have been displaced, and thousands killed in fighting.
  
Abdul Hussein Majid Quing, 16, stands at attention while being trained along with other new recruits for the Sudanese Liberation Army in Bahai, Sudan,  August 25, 2004.
  
Soldiers with the Sudanese Liberation Army stand around  their weapons during a sandstorm in the village of Shigekaro, in Darfur, August 22, 2004.  The SLA is one of several of the Sudanese rebel groups controlling parts of Darfur in opposition to the Sudanese government.