lynsey addario, photographer

India: Tuburculosis in India

Indians wait outside private clinics on 'Hospital Road' in Dharbanga, Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. All types of medicines and treatments are available unregulated on hospital road in Darbhanga. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Sudama Rai, who has extra pulminary TB Plural effusion, sits with his wife, Daryapur Chapra in the general ward at the PMCH  Medical college in Patna, Bihar, India, August 13, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
A woman is prepared for surgery at a private clinic on 'Hospital Road' in Dharbanga after undergoing surgery on her uterus in Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. All types of medicines and treatments are available unregulated on hospital road in Darbhanga. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
     
  
Dr. Renu Singh checks a patient for possible signs of Tuburculosis in the district TB center in Patna, Bihar, India, August 10, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Indians stand online at the registration window of the Darbhanga Medical college in Darbhanga, Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Ribha Kuwari, 14, from Jahanabad, sits ill with Tuburculosis in the female section of the ward for TB patients at the Nalanda Medical College in Patna, Bihar, India, August 10, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
     
  
Indians stand outside of the DOTS window and in the TB area at the PMCH  Medical college in Patna, Bihar, India, August 13, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Laxman Baitha, 65, who has Tuburculosis, sits with his malnourished grandson, Bipin, 1.5 years, in the village of Bahadurpur, in Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Sangita Kumari, 26, prepares TB stains for TB detection tests at the district Tuburculosis center in Patna, Bihar, India, August 10, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
     
  
Neha Kumari, 14, far left, who is infected with TB and undergoing DOTS treatment, sits in the room she shares with her father, Sunila, center, and her four siblings and mother in Patna, Bihar, India, August 10, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases, and is often spread in cramped living conditions like these. TB is an airborne disease, and many poor Indian families share small quarters, where the disease is spread among family members. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Maduja, 24, right, lies in a private hospital room on 'Hospital Road' in Dharbanga after undergoing surgery on her uterus in Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. All types of medicines and treatments are available unregulated on hospital road in Darbhanga. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
An Indian family sits with an IV for their son in 'The New X Ray Clinic' on  'Hospital Road' in Dharbanga in Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. All types of medicines and treatments are available unregulated on hospital road in Darbhanga. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
     
  
Indians at the district TB center in Patna, Bihar, India, August 11, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Indian men sit in a market for wholesale perscripton drugs in Patna, Bihar, India, August 10, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.
  
Indians stand outside of the TB window and waiting room at the Darbhanga Medical college in Darbhanga, Bihar, India, August 12, 2010. Tuburculosis kills about 6,000 people each day, a number that is higher than AIDS or Malaria, the other two deadliest infectious diseases. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimates there will be ten million new TB cases, with at least a quarter of those in India.